Depression and Suicide Ideation

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Depression

Major depression is one of the most common mental disorders in the United States. For some individuals, major depression can result in severe impairments that interfere with or limit one’s ability to carry out major life activities.

A period of two weeks or longer during which there is either depressed mood or loss of interest or pleasure, and at least four other symptoms that reflect a change in functioning, such as problems with sleep, eating, energy, concentration, self-image or recurrent thoughts of death or suicide.

An estimated 16.2 million adults in the United States had at least one major depressive episode. This number represented 6.7% of all U.S. adults.

The prevalence of major depressive episode was higher among adult females (8.5%) compared to males (4.8%).

The prevalence of adults with a major depressive episode was highest among individuals aged 18-25 (10.9%).

The prevalence of major depressive episode was highest among adults reporting two or races (10.5%).

 

Suicide Ideation

The data about Suicide Ideation is not recent so we can only assume that the numbers increased. During 2008–09, an estimated 8.3 million adults aged 18 and over in the United States, or 3.7% of the adult U.S. population, reported having suicidal thoughts in the previous year. An estimated 2.2 million in the U.S. reported having made suicide plans in 2014

Suicidal thoughts, or suicidal ideation, means thinking about or planning suicide. Thoughts can range from a detailed plan to a fleeting consideration. It does not include the final act of suicide.

Suicidal thoughts are common, and many people experience them when they are undergoing stress or experiencing depression. In most cases, these are temporary and can be treated, but in some cases, they place the individual at risk for attempting or completing suicide.

Most people who experience suicidal ideation do not carry it through, although some may make suicide attempts.

Anyone who has suicidal thoughts should ask for help. If a loved one is having these thoughts, measures should be taken to help and protect them.

See the last section of this article for information on how to get help for someone who is experiencing suicidal thoughts.

 

Treatment of Depression and Suicide Ideation

The Chevalier Institute’s methods are effective to treat depression and eliminate suicidal ideation.